Beyonce’s ‘Renaissance’ contains revolutionary act of choosing to be happy

With her seventh solo album, “Renaissance,” Beyoncé offers an antidote to today’s ills, with only a brief look at politics and protest.

Some called the album escapism, concerned that the influential artist wasn’t focusing her voice on her bitter struggle against injustice. Of course, her stardom can get a lot of attention for any issue, but her main focus isn’t power, it’s her fans in battle. Now, many of her fans are eager to opt for the revolutionary act of joy.

why we wrote this

With her new album “Renaissance,” Beyoncé is focused on supporting her fans, many of whom crave happiness, our columnist suggests.

Beyoncé may not meet the expectations that superstars often fail to deliver when it comes to driving systemic social change, but she’s there to reflect the needs and wants of black women and members of the LGBTQ community who love her.

The album at times expresses in clear language the exhaustion and frustration that so many black women express, who need a break and need some black joy—happy, free, and Recharge to meet the ongoing challenge of racism.

“Renaissance” helps us remember what it feels like to be happy – and integrate it into our bodies. What could be more free than this?

Beyoncé’s latest project, Renaissance, is a dance party for our post-everything world.

With her seventh solo album, the singing supernova offers an antidote to today’s ills, offering only a fleeting glimpse into politics and protest. Instead, she made room for joy, self-love, and fiery confidence. But critics wonder if this escapism will be enough to give hungry fans what they need in today’s social struggles, or if the ball will be a soundtrack to forget boycotts in favor of pop fun.

Beyoncé is very good at reflecting the mood and energy of her large following. She may not meet the expectations that superstars often fail to deliver in driving systemic social change, but she’s there to reflect the needs of black women and members of the LGBTQ community who love her.

why we wrote this

With her new album “Renaissance,” Beyoncé is focused on supporting her fans, many of whom crave happiness, our columnist suggests.

She voiced their frustration on her previous studio album, “Lemonade,” and on “Renaissance,” she gave listeners an intense and beautiful space. (After an outcry from disability advocates, she even agreed to remove a slang term from the song “Heated,” and she reportedly also removed songs she sampled with the owner’s knowledge, not the artist’s.) The album explain, Using explicit language at times, many black women who needed a break expressed exhaustion and frustration, needing some black joy—joy, freedom, and recharge—to face the ongoing challenge of racism.

When so many people are hurting or suffering these days, happiness often seems out of reach and maybe even inappropriate. Happiness and contentment are difficult to cultivate when raw materials are so scarce. But joy comes from somewhere other than the joy of the day. Joy, like hope, is not the result of circumstances, but a choice one makes regardless of circumstances.

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